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Author Topic: The Wait Continues  (Read 2655 times)

Offline cdillon8769

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The Wait Continues
« on: January 24, 2014, 11:47:19 AM »
Things were moving fairly quickly for me for a while and  turned in placement questions, but again I wait. (Applied over a year ago). I'm getting a little frustrated with the process and waiting for an invite is driving me crazy. I got an email from placement on Jan 9th saying that it might be a while before I hear something. I know that having patience is important for Peace Corps both with application and once abroad, but I've been waiting longer than the average volunteer. I know timelines are average and that no two volunteers are the same, but I soon have to make decisions regarding my future, but its on hold. For now, advice?
Caroline
Invitee: Lesotho, Africa June 2014

"The ones crazy enough to believe that they can change the world, do" Steve Jobs

Offline worldofinflation

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 09:48:28 AM »
My advice, Read (as much as you can). Read about Peace Corps experiences, third world development, the history of aid ect... Educate yourself about the macro issues that are universally relevant to the development work you'll be doing (wherever that may be).

Second: Talk to people. Find people that work in international development, find RPCVS that went to your alma mater (for me there were only 2) and listen to anything they have to say. This advice is invaluable.

Third: Stay engaged in the process. Push the Peace Corps (but of course don't be a nuisance). My application was lost in the shuffle when someone in admin quit and my files were shifted over to someone new. The medical process in particular is incredibility bureaucratic.

Fourth: Find something else to do. Depending on your situation, you may to turn to your job to (constructively) distract you while you wait. In my case, I was a newly minted college graduate and had 8 months from graduation to departure (I leave in 1 week). I was able to secure a full-time internship shortly after graduation to keep myself busy.

That, in addition to practicing patience, is all you really can do as you wait. My process from application to placement was a year and four months so I know the frustration (and lack of control) you feel. Although trite, it is truly worth it in the end.


Offline markvsgravity

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 04:14:13 PM »
Hey, I know it's tough waiting especially when you keep seeing other people get invites who applied after you. It seems as if you've been passed over and forgotten. You've been waiting over a year which is a real long time, and if it's any consolation I kind of know what you are going through. I applied on the 1st of Jan. last year and got my invite to Guyana on Christmas Eve which, while it isn't as long as you've had to wait, still seemed like forever.

During this wait you should think about if the Peace Corps is something you really want to do. I hope to make a career out of humanitarian work so the Peace Corps was my one and only goal which allowed me to stick with it. In the mean time I came up with a contingency plan that included taking a course to advance my EMT license (even though I'll never be able to use it since I got my invite and leave a week after I should get my license).

Ultimately my advice would be to find something that keeps you occupied, you worry less about getting in and when the invite comes through it actually catches you off guard. Taking a course is a good option here because it takes up a lot of time and can give you some useful skills that you may even be able to put on a resume. A language course would be a good example. I doubt my advice will make waiting any easier but hopefully your invite comes through soon. Be patient and good luck!

Offline cdillon8769

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2014, 06:11:58 PM »
Hey guys.

Thanks for the support. I have done as much research as my brain can handle and then some. I have met/talked to several people. I know this is something that I need to do for a multitude of reasons. That being said, I just feel like my life is on a hold and there isn't much I can do. I am a planner by nature and I guess that is what is bugging me. I just wish I knew what was going on with my application. I know its a waiting game but my patience is running thin... I am trying to hang in there, but I can't have my life on hold on the possibility of an invitation. I know that I am at the end of the application process and and I am just waiting on the invite. I guess I'm just trying to hang in there a bit longer.
Caroline
Invitee: Lesotho, Africa June 2014

"The ones crazy enough to believe that they can change the world, do" Steve Jobs

Offline PeaceCorps1

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2014, 04:12:11 AM »
Yes, the medical is way too involved. I can understand the need for knowing what MAY occur medically, but from what I read online, fewer volunteers come home ill than those who ET, are unfortunately deceased via tragedy, or who become alcoholic...

There needs to be a smoother medical process.
"If it were not for the reporters, I'd tell you the truth"', President Chester A. Arthur

Offline wreloise

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2014, 09:04:10 AM »
The medical process is great training for multi-tasking  :)
Eloise-Born to Serve

Offline RPCVro

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Re: The Wait Continues
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2014, 08:37:09 PM »
Yes, the medical is way too involved. I can understand the need for knowing what MAY occur medically, but from what I read online, fewer volunteers come home ill than those who ET, are unfortunately deceased via tragedy, or who become alcoholic...

There needs to be a smoother medical process.

The fact that so few volunteers suffer a severe medical issue during service is a testament to the efficacy of the medical clearance process. It used to be that you had to do ALL your final medical clearance stuff BEFORE you were considered for an invitation, so they do try to reform the process over time. Something as "normal" as asthma or a peanut allergy can have a huge impact on where a volunteer can serve, so imagine all the potential complications from more serious conditions or past medical issues. Peace Corps is responsible for your health out in the field. While the process of getting to "the field" might be exhausting and frustrating, you should be able to rest easier at the end of it knowing that you've been invited to a country that can provide medical assistance for your situation.