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Author Topic: Is there a disadvantage to applying, while married, without the spouse going?  (Read 2312 times)

Offline lauriannstanley

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As I complete the application process, I am just wondering whether it is a disadvantage to apply while married. My spouse is fully supportive, yet he has no desire to join. How will this effect the decision made by Peace Corps?

Offline RPCVro

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During my years of service, there were at least 2 or 3 women I knew who were serving without their husbands. Just make sure you explain why you're willing to do this without your spouse, how you plan to manage the relationship long-distance, etc. From Peace Corps' perspective, their biggest concern is that you'll terminate your service early. I don't think you'll be treated any differently than an unmarried applicant who has indicated he/she has been/will be in a long-distance relationship with a significant other. When I applied, there was a separate form to fill out about romantic relationships. I'm not sure if that's still included with the pre-check paperwork you receive after your nomination.

Offline PeaceCorps1

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It's your fellow volunteers who will most likely pass judgment. Good luck.
"If it were not for the reporters, I'd tell you the truth"', President Chester A. Arthur

Offline shawn

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Technically speaking, PC cannot legally discriminate against you based on marital status. That said, the will take it into consideration. Or, more, accurately, they want to make sure YOU have taken all of it into consideration. they'll ask you some pretty pointed and specific about your decision to join while your spouse does not, so I would just be prepared to over justify why you want to go and that you can handle living apart for this long.

 
PCVL - Rwanda 2010-2013
NPCA Serving Volunteer Advisory Council

Offline RetiredFed

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I am doing exactly that right now.  They wanted only a notarized letter from my wife that it was ok with her.  She will come visit me often of course.  She loves to travel.  I think it was much easier for PC to place one person rather than two, which is why we decided to do it this way.

Offline RPCVro

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Things to keep in mind if your spouse plans to visit, is that they will be regarded the same as any other visitor (friend or family member) to a volunteer during service. This means that you will have to abide by the same policies. Volunteers cannot receive visitors during the first 6 months and last 3 months of their service (during these same times, you cannot use your Annual Leave accrual)-some exceptions for those whose assignments are based on the academic year. If their presence causes you to be absent from your responsibilities, you will have to use your Annual Leave (24 days/year, accrued at 2 days/month).

As has been mentioned, you will likely be questioned very pointedly and specifically how to plan to handle the particular stresses of a long-distance romantic involvement. Approach it from a practical stance and demonstrate that you've thought long and critically about the choice and what impact it will have.